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4 Financial Moves Freelancers And Gig Workers Should Consider To Better Plan Their Personal Finances

Published by Autumn on November 03, 2020 The lifestyle of a freelancer or gig worker differs significantly from that of a person employed full-time. For starters, your definition of an office is very different – you can be working from home, at a café, or hot-desking at a co-working space. It can also mean starting at 8 a.m. if you’re an early bird, or burning the midnight oil if your creative juices flow better after sunset. However, being your own boss comes with its own set of challenges. As a solopreneur, you’re on your own. You’ll have to handle

5 Money Habits You Need To Know If You Are Out Of Job Now

Published by Autumn on October 01, 2020 In this time of uncertainty, building good money habits is important to tide you through especially if your job has been disrupted. Here are 5 money habits you could develop. They are so simple but often overlooked! Tip 1: Plug your spending leaks and look for lost money Start by spring cleaning your finances to identify spending leaks. This can be as simple as going through your credit card statements to ensure you’re not paying for a service you don’t use anymore or that you’re not double-paying for a subscription. Could it

A 7-Step Financial Checklist To Get You Started On Your Financial Journey

Published by Autumn on 6 April, 2021 Financial planning need not be complex if you break it up into smaller steps. When take one step at a time, planning for the future doesn’t seem daunting anymore. You don’t need a lot to start building your wealth - the important thing is to start now regardless of which life stage you are at. Here’s a 7-step financial checklist to get you started. 1. Set realistic money goals for the year Instead of setting a resolution you won’t stick to, give yourself specific goals instead. If you’re stuck on setting

How To Plug Your Insurance Protection Gap (In Any Life Stage)

Published by Autumn on November 03, 2020 An insurance protection gap is typically the difference between how much money you will need compared to how much money you will have in the event of an unfortunate scenario. For example, you may estimate that it will take $360,000 to raise and educate your newborn he or she enters the working world and becomes financially self-dependent. You will be working for the next close to two decades to afford this. If you do not have any savings or life insurance, your insurance protection gap is $360,000. If you already have some

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